Active living in Kingston Ontario

Summit Aims to “Change the Way We Do Sport”

Denita & Jenny photo(Sharing article by Michael Lea, printed in the Kingston Whig Standard October 29)

Most conferences can be pretty sedentary affairs.

You gather in a hall and sit around a table to listen to speakers or watch multimedia presentations on a screen. The most active you get is writing notes or heading for the coffee pot during breaks.

But a gathering in Kingston next month will take an entirely different approach. At least half the presentations will have participants up out of their chairs and actively involved in the topic.

Canadian Sport for Life Kingston, part of a national movement to improve the quality of sport and physical activity in Canada through sport that is appropriate to the individual development of the players in any setting, is hosting a one-day Play for Life Summit at the Ambassador Conference Resort on Friday, Nov. 7, running from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.

“It’s a really cool model that has the potential to change the way we do sport and physical activity in Canada,” said Denita Arthurs, the city’s assistant supervisor for recreation programs and the local project leader for Sport for Life.

Under Sport for Life, chronological age is less important than the child’s developmental maturity.

So instead of delivering a sport activity for all seven-year-olds, it would be tailored to match the individual child’s physical, mental, emotional and cognitive levels.

The group has received funding to work on implementing the model in Kingston, and the summit is part of that mandate.

Twenty workshops and two nationally known keynote speakers will be focusing on how to increase the quality of sport and physical activity in the city.

“The really unique thing about this summit is that, in the same room, will be teachers and coaches and recreation providers and child-care providers and doctors,” Arthurs said. “They will be all having the same conversation and be trained in the same language, with the same tools. Finally, there will be networking happening amongst sectors.

“So when a child leaves a school at the end of the day, they will receive training in the same language they did at school, at the recreation club, as they would at their sports club.”

James Mandigo, from Brock University’s Centre for healthy development, and Colin Higgs, one of the founders of Canadian Sport for Life, will address the conference.

Workshops will include concussion education, planning fitness fun days, sports for aboriginal youth, teaching games, accommodating those with physical difficulties, and promoting the benefits of physical activity.

“It is high, high quality training and development,” Arthurs said.

Although most of the people at the conference will be involved in sports either at schools or other community groups, members of the general public are also welcome at attend.

The fact the words “For Life” appear in both the group’s and the summit’s names is key, said Jenny Ashbury, co-chair for the summit along with Ashley Johnson, a Queen’s University PhD student.

“The overall objective is to get individuals active for life,” she explained. “We are trying to promote individuals to become physically literate when they are young, so that they can either be competitive and go to the Olympics or, like the majority of the population, they can become active for life by being able to participate in a wide range of physical activities.”

She said the summit would start at the root of physical activities, focusing on children.

This is the first time such a conference has been held in Kingston. Hamilton is the only other Ontario city to host one.

A national summit is held each year in Quebec, and it is important that the new tools and methods that may be discussed at that level are passed on to the grassroots, Arthurs said.

“There is always a struggle to disseminate that knowledge locally so the people on the ground, the front-line program providers, are being trained, are aware, are equipped to use that new knowledge and those new tools, and so this summit is one of the ways we can do that,” Arthurs said.

The summit is being funded by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

They had initially hoped to have 125 people attend, but the latest count is approaching 300.

Most of the participants will be from Kingston, but other Ontario cities will also be represented.

Arthurs said the summit could enhance what some sports educators are already doing.

“Some people are intuitively already teaching or leading programs in a developmentally friendly way and fostering physical literacy. This might give them a language that is common with other program providers so it creates more of a dialogue and chance to network.”

For others, it will be a chance to learn more about the tools and resources available.

“Everyone is going to get something out of it,” Arthurs said.

Even parents whose only involvement in sports may be talking with their child’s coach or teacher or recreation provider can benefit by knowing more about the process and the terminology used.

“Being able to speak the same language that they do puts you on the same playing field and it enables you to advocate for your child in a new way and a stronger way,” Arthurs said.

The cost for the summit is $20 for students and $50 for general admission. Those attending must register online first at www.CS4LKingston.com/play-for-life-summit.

michael.lea@sunmedia.ca

Source:  http://www.thewhig.com/2014/10/28/summit-aims-to-change-the-way-we-do-sport

Denita & Jenny photo(Sharing article by Michael Lea, printed in the Kingston Whig Standard October 29)

Most conferences can be pretty sedentary affairs.

You gather in a hall and sit around a table to listen to speakers or watch multimedia presentations on a screen. The most active you get is writing notes or heading for the coffee pot during breaks.

But a gathering in Kingston next month will take an entirely different approach. At least half the presentations will have participants up out of their chairs and actively involved in the topic.

Canadian Sport for Life Kingston, part of a national movement to improve the quality of sport and physical activity in Canada through sport that is appropriate to the individual development of the players in any setting, is hosting a one-day Play for Life Summit at the Ambassador Conference Resort on Friday, Nov. 7, running from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.

“It’s a really cool model that has the potential to change the way we do sport and physical activity in Canada,” said Denita Arthurs, the city’s assistant supervisor for recreation programs and the local project leader for Sport for Life.

Under Sport for Life, chronological age is less important than the child’s developmental maturity.

So instead of delivering a sport activity for all seven-year-olds, it would be tailored to match the individual child’s physical, mental, emotional and cognitive levels.

The group has received funding to work on implementing the model in Kingston, and the summit is part of that mandate.

Twenty workshops and two nationally known keynote speakers will be focusing on how to increase the quality of sport and physical activity in the city.

“The really unique thing about this summit is that, in the same room, will be teachers and coaches and recreation providers and child-care providers and doctors,” Arthurs said. “They will be all having the same conversation and be trained in the same language, with the same tools. Finally, there will be networking happening amongst sectors.

“So when a child leaves a school at the end of the day, they will receive training in the same language they did at school, at the recreation club, as they would at their sports club.”

James Mandigo, from Brock University’s Centre for healthy development, and Colin Higgs, one of the founders of Canadian Sport for Life, will address the conference.

Workshops will include concussion education, planning fitness fun days, sports for aboriginal youth, teaching games, accommodating those with physical difficulties, and promoting the benefits of physical activity.

“It is high, high quality training and development,” Arthurs said.

Although most of the people at the conference will be involved in sports either at schools or other community groups, members of the general public are also welcome at attend.

The fact the words “For Life” appear in both the group’s and the summit’s names is key, said Jenny Ashbury, co-chair for the summit along with Ashley Johnson, a Queen’s University PhD student.

“The overall objective is to get individuals active for life,” she explained. “We are trying to promote individuals to become physically literate when they are young, so that they can either be competitive and go to the Olympics or, like the majority of the population, they can become active for life by being able to participate in a wide range of physical activities.”

She said the summit would start at the root of physical activities, focusing on children.

This is the first time such a conference has been held in Kingston. Hamilton is the only other Ontario city to host one.

A national summit is held each year in Quebec, and it is important that the new tools and methods that may be discussed at that level are passed on to the grassroots, Arthurs said.

“There is always a struggle to disseminate that knowledge locally so the people on the ground, the front-line program providers, are being trained, are aware, are equipped to use that new knowledge and those new tools, and so this summit is one of the ways we can do that,” Arthurs said.

The summit is being funded by the Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

They had initially hoped to have 125 people attend, but the latest count is approaching 300.

Most of the participants will be from Kingston, but other Ontario cities will also be represented.

Arthurs said the summit could enhance what some sports educators are already doing.

“Some people are intuitively already teaching or leading programs in a developmentally friendly way and fostering physical literacy. This might give them a language that is common with other program providers so it creates more of a dialogue and chance to network.”

For others, it will be a chance to learn more about the tools and resources available.

“Everyone is going to get something out of it,” Arthurs said.

Even parents whose only involvement in sports may be talking with their child’s coach or teacher or recreation provider can benefit by knowing more about the process and the terminology used.

“Being able to speak the same language that they do puts you on the same playing field and it enables you to advocate for your child in a new way and a stronger way,” Arthurs said.

The cost for the summit is $20 for students and $50 for general admission. Those attending must register online first at www.CS4LKingston.com/play-for-life-summit.

michael.lea@sunmedia.ca

Source:  http://www.thewhig.com/2014/10/28/summit-aims-to-change-the-way-we-do-sport

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